A Couple New Mousers

One

Banned
These are from my Mouse Hawk Series, blade lengths aprox., 5 inches, edge widths aprox., 3 inches with 15 inch handles . It's been a while since I've made any, so I thought I'd post a couple pix.

Both are forged from 1-1/4 by 1/4 inch 5160, with double fag welded blades and forged brazed with bronze at the eye for extra strength. Handles are ebonized maple.



 

wall e

Well-Known Member
Simple,stylish,usable and classic looks. This seems to be something I have come to know as anything associated with your nam Tai. Not to mention is really adding to the itch to get a forge and learn to mold metal with some force into tools.
 

lightknot

Member
Nice clean lines, bronze at the eye, superb details. Great work from a fellow Tucsonan.
BTW I went to college with your daughter. She said that she always could count on a new knife for Christmas and her birthday!
 
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One

Banned
Thanks.


Forge brazing isn’t something you see too much anymore, but since there is usually a bit of an incomplete forge weld right at the blade to eye transition area, it makes sense on these hawks. I never seen it or heard of it on hawks like this, but figure it can’t hurt and only help. Welding carbon steel is a bit trickier than wrought iron or mild steel and has to be done at a lower temperature to avoid burning the steel. So, The forge brazing is a good safety net with the all steel wrapped hawks, as well as the double fag weld (no seam/top grain) along the edge. I usually use copper or bronze to braze with, but think I favor the bronze because it melts a bit lower and seems to flow a bit better. I pickle the hawk heads (pre heat treat), in a crock pot of hot white vinegar, then wire bush the inside of the eye transition area to clean it up as prep., for the braze,… rather than just fluxing and brushing. The pickling and bushing yields a much cleaner surface to start with and a better seam.
 
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One

Banned
This illustration shows the difference between the standard all steel wrapped hawk (top) and my improved “double fag welded” hawk (bottom). One end is scarfed and left a bit longer than the other, then wrapped over the edge. It accomplishes several things,… gives you more material to work with at the edge for a better weld and a wider edge. It eliminates the seam along the edge, and it replaces the weaker end grain of the steel with the stronger top grain.

 

taylormadeknives

Well-Known Member
This illustration shows the difference between the standard all steel wrapped hawk (top) and my improved “double fag welded” hawk (bottom). One end is scarfed and left a bit longer than the other, then wrapped over the edge. It accomplishes several things,… gives you more material to work with at the edge for a better weld and a wider edge. It eliminates the seam along the edge, and it replaces the weaker end grain of the steel with the stronger top grain.

Thanks for sharing! That seems like it's a better and stronger way to do it

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