Cutting logs

izafireman

Well-Known Member
Not sure if anyone will know the answer to this but I have several burls and some logs of Laburnum that are around 16 inches long and maybe 10 inches round.
I used to have a band saw which I sold and although I could cut logs on this it was a tad scary if the blade jammed / grabbed.

Now I want to be able to cut the laburnum logs on my table saw but once again difficult and not a safe job, in fact I wont try unless I can find a safe method,

So does anyone cut their own burls/logs on a tables saw in order to reduce down for making into manageable blocks to stabilise and then make scales from?

I am sure I have seen someone use what I think is called a sled years ago but cannot find it on my searches now in relation to using for logs.

As I value my fingers I thought I would ask.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT...I just found a method when I changed my search wording, so I will post here
If anyone knows of any other methods please feel free to add as I am sure there will be other methods.... Might mean I can finally cut some of the old burls I have.
 
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Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
I use the cahinsaw on a chalkline along the side of the log to create a flat and then that flat to get one side square to the flat and then using these two flats I can use start to square the log and start to break it down. Larger diameter pieces I will create a flat either side of the heart wood that I may want for knife handles etc. and go from there.
 

soundmind

Well-Known Member
I've cut up three the way Garry said, except without a bandsaw.

I laid it flat on the chainsaw cut and cut down with a handsaw. I've also shimmed it up the other way SECURE and made 2" deep cuts with a circ saw and finished with a handsaw. I made sure there was no where it could go and had both hands on the saw. Mine were dry and were spruce and birch, so they weren't hardwood.

I don't plan on using too much birch or spruce for knives but were I to do it again I send it out to someone with a bandsaw.

I've also worked on table saw with a sliding table - not sure if that is what you were referring to by a "sled."
Edit: no it isn't, but I think if the log could roll (turn even a little) it could bind... scary
 
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izafireman

Well-Known Member
I've cut up three the way Garry said, except without a bandsaw.

I laid it flat on the chainsaw cut and cut down with a handsaw. I've also shimmed it up the other way SECURE and made 2" deep cuts with a circ saw and finished with a handsaw. I made sure there was no where it could go and had both hands on the saw. Mine were dry and were spruce and birch, so they weren't hardwood.

I don't plan on using too much birch or spruce for knives but were I to do it again I send it out to someone with a bandsaw.

I've also worked on table saw with a sliding table - not sure if that is what you were referring to by a "sled."
Edit: no it isn't, but I think if the log could roll (turn even a little) it could bind... scary

Thanks for the replies gents and it is the log rolling that puts the fear of God up me :eek: as when they bind they don't half kick. I will try the methods as described and obviously the important bit is getting a flat on the log. If I cannot managed it (as very dense wood) I think I will buy some beers in and burn them on the log fire instead :)
 

Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
It is quite simple to get a flat with the chainsaw if you are reasonably competant and even if you use a bench planer to get the second flat from that although if it takes a lot of runs over the bench to do it and then you have somewhere to start from. It is the initial cut with the chainsaw that gets it underway and that is not a hard cut to makeif you use the length of the bar to "aim" the cut down the chalk line.
 

izafireman

Well-Known Member
It is quite simple to get a flat with the chainsaw if you are reasonably competant and even if you use a bench planer to get the second flat from that although if it takes a lot of runs over the bench to do it and then you have somewhere to start from. It is the initial cut with the chainsaw that gets it underway and that is not a hard cut to makeif you use the length of the bar to "aim" the cut down the chalk line.
I shall give it a whirl then as just bought a few new chains for the saw so the will cut nice and straight
 
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