Dryer Outlet

Chris Martin

Well-Known Member
Morning Dogs,

Got another newb question for you.

How many of you makers have taped into your dryer outlet/220V and ran your grinder off of it?

I have been having power issues down in the dungeon and will be moving the shop upstairs to the garage area. All of my power downstairs is through long extension cords. Yes, I stole power from upstairs....LOL Its all rigged down there. I have had it with bogging down on my grinder. So, up to the garage I go. We will be moving soon or I would just try to run some lines from my breaker. But its not worth it for me to invest any more time into this house. Plus, I HATE electric.

I will have access to my dryer outlet and will be buying a 2HP motor to go with my soon to be new grinder. I will just keep my Coote running on 120 and then set-up the NWG, KDG, or KMG up on the 220V.

Just wondering how many of you have done this and if its practical enough to do?

Thanks for the help guys.

Chris
 

Raymond Richard

Forum Owner & Moderator
You may have to up the amps on the breaker for the dryer. Check your grinder motor and it should tell you how many amps you need to run the motor. Now this could cause a problem for the dryer if its more amps than what is already there. I think you may have to bite the bullet and just add another line. Hire an electrician if its something your not comfortable doing. It ain't worth burning down the house.
 

Chris Martin

Well-Known Member
Hey Raymond,

Thanks for replying.

I checked the outlet for the dryer. It is rated for 250V- 30a. Seems a bit high for a standard 2HP Single Phase motor to run off of????





You may have to up the amps on the breaker for the dryer. Check your grinder motor and it should tell you how many amps you need to run the motor. Now this could cause a problem for the dryer if its more amps than what is already there. I think you may have to bite the bullet and just add another line. Hire an electrician if its something your not comfortable doing. It ain't worth burning down the house.
 

Chris Martin

Well-Known Member
I decided to look around in the garage area to see what other power options I may have.

Could this be a more practical 220V outlet?
220VOutlet.jpg


I hope so, But it could just be an ancient 110V outlet...?? LOL Also appears to have some burn on the right side.....;-0
 

JAWilliams

KNIFEMAKER
Put a meter to it. And you are right about seeing burn marks. Could be several things that did it but it is more scorch. Meter would be your best bet. Where is it located? If it is near a window could very well be 220 that was for an A/C window unit. Now for your breaker on the dryer. That is the amount of amps it will handle. I asked the same thing of my father in law (electrical engineer). First I got a huge long story and still had the stupid look on my face. So he said to make it simple The breaker will pop at 30 amps, you will be running 7.5 amps. You are safe.
 

cdent

Well-Known Member
I've run off my dryer outlet for a few years with a homemade extension cord and no issues. I'd agree that outlet picture looks like it's 220v. Shouldn't be too big a deal, as mentioned above, to see if it's hot and working right. I think I'd just pick up a new outlet anyway if the line is usable.

Good luck with it, Craig
 

CDHumiston

Well-Known Member
That line in the picture looks like 220, but you need to measure it to be sure. The burn marks look like something shorted out or over heated when plugged in there? I would replace the outlet if you intend to use it. Make sure you find the correct breaker and turn the outlet OFF before you work on it! 220 will bite you hard.
 

Chris Martin

Well-Known Member
:D:D:D Music to my ears fellas:D:D:D Thanks for helping a fellow dog.2thumbs

James my bro....I will try and give you a call this weekend. Got your message earlier buddy. Sounds great!!!

Thanks again to the dog pound:running dog:

Chris

Put a meter to it. And you are right about seeing burn marks. Could be several things that did it but it is more scorch. Meter would be your best bet. Where is it located? If it is near a window could very well be 220 that was for an A/C window unit. Now for your breaker on the dryer. That is the amount of amps it will handle. I asked the same thing of my father in law (electrical engineer). First I got a huge long story and still had the stupid look on my face. So he said to make it simple The breaker will pop at 30 amps, you will be running 7.5 amps. You are safe.

I've run off my dryer outlet for a few years with a homemade extension cord and no issues. I'd agree that outlet picture looks like it's 220v. Shouldn't be too big a deal, as mentioned above, to see if it's hot and working right. I think I'd just pick up a new outlet anyway if the line is usable.

Good luck with it, Craig

That line in the picture looks like 220, but you need to measure it to be sure. The burn marks look like something shorted out or over heated when plugged in there? I would replace the outlet if you intend to use it. Make sure you find the correct breaker and turn the outlet OFF before you work on it! 220 will bite you hard.
 

Troop

Well-Known Member
I've been running my 2-HP Variable KMG off my dryer outlet for a few years now, and, with a really long cord to boot! No problems.
 

Mike Barton

Well-Known Member
Chris the outlet in your picture is a NEMA 6-15. It is rated for 15 Amps 240 Volts. It would typically be used for something like a medium sized window air conditioner, as stated before. You should find the 2 pole 15 AMP breaker for it and turn it off before you replace the receptacle. Yes you need to replace that receptacle. :(

That receptacle is rated for up to a 2 HP motor. Once you have replaced it you can run your grinder to your hearts content as it is the exact size breaker and wiring needed for running your 2 HP grinder. :D Your local home improvement store should have the plug, a 6-15P, in stock at a reasonable cost. Pick one up and wire it to your grinder power cable and your in business.

Good find, now go to it.
 

Chris Martin

Well-Known Member
Right on, Mike! Sounds simple enough....I like simple2thumbs

Oh yeah....2HP here I come!!!!!!

Thanks again buddy.

Chris

Chris the outlet in your picture is a NEMA 6-15. It is rated for 15 Amps 240 Volts. It would typically be used for something like a medium sized window air conditioner, as stated before. You should find the 2 pole 15 AMP breaker for it and turn it off before you replace the receptacle. Yes you need to replace that receptacle. :(

That receptacle is rated for up to a 2 HP motor. Once you have replaced it you can run your grinder to your hearts content as it is the exact size breaker and wiring needed for running your 2 HP grinder. :D Your local home improvement store should have the plug, a 6-15P, in stock at a reasonable cost. Pick one up and wire it to your grinder power cable and your in business.

Good find, now go to it.
 

Leadfoot

Well-Known Member
I would definitely replace that receptical first tho. no sense taking chances with that burnt plug.

Leadfoot
 

Rusty McDonald

KNIFE MAKER
Not my dryer but I did put a DPDT switch on my Hot water heater and use it as the power for my grinder.
I can also turn off the heater when Im out of town for extended stays as well.
 

Keith Willis

Well-Known Member
I don't know a lot about electricity,but before I became disabled,I was working on rewiring my 56 year old home,so I can run a wire,but that is about it.I paid someone to change out the service.
What I was trying to say is,when you change out that plug,make sure the wire is at least
a #10.I have seen 220 plugs wired with #12 wire.

God bless,Keith
 

SteelSlaver

Well-Known Member
I would think that with a 15 amp breaker 12 gauge wire would be fine depending on the distance. 12 gauge is often used for 20 amp service and is rated for 20 amps. I did wire all my 20 amp 220 breakers with 10 gauge though because you should only load a wire to 80% of its rated capacity.

There are 2 important things to know about wire size. Amperage and distance. Modern Romex wire is rated for 600v and that is a function of the insulation, not wire size. Your breaker must not be higher than the rated amperage capacity of the wire. Then there is distance, the longer the run the more resistance. If you take a 100' 16 gauge extension cord and a 15 amp 110 outlet you will be lucky to have a usable 100v at the end of the cord. If you run is over say 50' go up one wire size.
 
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