End consumer best sharpening solution?

BossDog

KnifeDogs.com & USAknifemaker.com Owner
Staff member
I get asked by non-knife people what is the best way to sharpen their kitchen knives.

Usually what they mean is will I sharpen their knives? I tell everyone I have a one time free sharpening service going on right now. I’ll sharpen their knives once for no charge and turn down any offers of payment. I also tell them to not tell anyone else.

By then they are done talking knives and I am just getting started.


To answer their sharpening question I usually suggest a Magic Chef electric sharpener. There are several models but they are all basically the same. These do work well for kitchen knives but the last inch or so before the tang doesn’t get touched. This is a deal breaker for small knives and pocket knives.

what do you suggest for non-knife people?
 

Mister Coffee

Well-Known Member
I am a "beginner sharpener," so this is something that I am thinking about. I don't own one yet, but the Spyderco Tri-Angle Sharpmaker is worth looking into. Spyderco says it will make any knife screaming sharp, as long as it's not totally trashed when you start. For me, I wouldn't use an electric sharpener. We had those on the kitchen counter in the 1960s. Maybe they're different now, but for me it's a) too much power and not enough feel, b) you can't see what you're doing. I'm also trying to get the hang of freehand sharpening on diamond stones, ceramic rods and strops. But freehand is no good for non-knife people.

I look forward to following the responses in this thread. :)
 

Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
Assuming Dexter Russel or less in quality('cause non-knife people...)...a smith co carbide drag sharpener(you know...the bright orange ones...)...serious. you can make most kitchen knives work well with those. Yes it is not a honed or stropped or even smooth finish...yes it will eventually serrated that cheap knife...who cares.Lol. They cut well...
 

Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
I recommend a Warthog V-Sharp Classic II. It does not get any easier than this and it works. The original WartHog sharpener was built much better before they were bought out but these work.


This is what I recommend to knife people (even though you did not ask) in fact, this is what I use on my knives currently.

 

chrisstaniar

Well-Known Member
I've been using the Ken Onion Work Sharp and I'm pretty pleased with it. Angles are adjustable, speed is adjustable, good belt lift, and it puts a razor edge on the blade pretty quickly. The edge is a convex edge because the belt runs in a slack belt type of config.

Now I do put the secondary bevel on first with my 72" and get a reasonably sharp edge with that. Then I get the worksharp out.
 

Mister Coffee

Well-Known Member
I've been using the Ken Onion Work Sharp and I'm pretty pleased with it. Angles are adjustable, speed is adjustable, good belt lift, and it puts a razor edge on the blade pretty quickly. The edge is a convex edge because the belt runs in a slack belt type of config.

Now I do put the secondary bevel on first with my 72" and get a reasonably sharp edge with that. Then I get the worksharp out.

What's a 72"?
 

CDHumiston

KNIFE MAKER
I honestly suggest they get some mid priced wet stones and watch a few good YouTube videos.

I've never had any gadget that sharpened a knife the way I like. The closest easy use item for me would
be the Spyderco Tri-Angle Sharp Maker.
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
I've been using the Ken Onion Work Sharp and I'm pretty pleased with it. Angles are adjustable, speed is adjustable, good belt lift, and it puts a razor edge on the blade pretty quickly. The edge is a convex edge because the belt runs in a slack belt type of config.

Now I do put the secondary bevel on first with my 72" and get a reasonably sharp edge with that. Then I get the worksharp out.

Workshop works good. Easy to use with a little practice. Just gotta be careful I've had mine scratch some blades on me! I make sure I clean the bumpers the blade rubs on that sets the angle before I sharpen things now.
 

Gilbert M

Active Member
I mostly sell kitchen knives for those like @CDHumiston I would say learn wet stones You tube or find a class. If not have them professionally sharpened (one freebie by me). They can maintain there edge with a ceramic hone rod. For other knives a small diamond wet stone (or stone)if they are capable for maintenance. Otherwise learn stones or a professional.
 
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Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
Workshop works good. Easy to use with a little practice. Just gotta be careful I've had mine scratch some blades on me! I make sure I clean the bumpers the blade rubs on that sets the angle before I sharpen things now.
I have had the same problem with the WS. A little painters tape on the flats near the spine works well. I moved on the the Multi-Angle Warthog after I wore the worksharp diamond plates out. Now, no more scratches, just use a piece of thin leather in the clamp and you are golden.
 

Randy Lucius

Well-Known Member
I recommend a Warthog V-Sharp Classic II. It does not get any easier than this and it works. The original WartHog sharpener was built much better before they were bought out but these work.


This is what I recommend to knife people (even though you did not ask) in fact, this is what I use on my knives currently.

I saw a demo of the Warthog V-Sharp Classic II this year at Bladeshow. I was pretty impressed with it. He sharpened by brother's extremely dull pocket knife very quickly. Might have to order one.
 

Chris Railey

Well-Known Member
I saw a demo of the Warthog V-Sharp Classic II this year at Bladeshow. I was pretty impressed with it. He sharpened by brother's extremely dull pocket knife very quickly. Might have to order one.
Years ago the company was small and each sharpener was made with way better quality. My Father In law has two of the original Warthogs that came mounted on a piece of Marble. If I could talk him out of one of those originals I would use it for everything. The Classic II's are made with better quality now but not as good as the original. That same guy at Blade Show is the one I bought my Multi-Angle from and I love it. He was a very nice guy.
 

chrisstaniar

Well-Known Member
I have had the same problem with the WS. A little painters tape on the flats near the spine works well. I moved on the the Multi-Angle Warthog after I wore the worksharp diamond plates out. Now, no more scratches, just use a piece of thin leather in the clamp and you are golden.

I do the same, I put some blue tape on it and cover all but about the bottom .25" and no scratches
 

Daniel Macina

Well-Known Member
That V Sharpe looks very interesting my only concern is the limited angles and having rods would result in a slightly different edge than having a regular flat I believe?
 
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