Getting it flat

firephil

Active Member
Which would be the better choice for getting scales dead flat, a flat platen or a disc? My platen is not very successful
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
I think that the primary requirement is that it be flat and long or wide enough to hold the full piece of work on it. When I'm flattening a scale or block I hold the long axis of the work parallel to the long axis of my platen, which is ceramic. You might also consider a flat piece of wood or stone with the sandpaper secured to it and do the job by hand if the power tools aren't working for you.

Doug
 

theWeatherman

Well-Known Member
i use a granite countertop scrap with sandpaper
scott

This is a must have sometimes. It fixed a lot of problems for me. You don't have to even use granite, you can get a thick pice of flat glass. YOu have to go get it special though, because normal glass is thing and can warp. I moved to a granite slab so that I could leather tool on it as well.
 

Taz575

Well-Known Member
WoodCraft has nice granite plates for like $35, but they go on sale for $25 occasionally. I use the platen on a 6x48 with coarse belts (50-80 grit) and then let the item sit for a day or two. If you get the scale too hot, it may warp and move on you a bit, so be careful to go slow. After the 6x48, I flatten on the Granite now that I have that, but I used to use a slab of 1" thick Micarta before I got the granite and sandpaper.
 

Shane Wink

Well-Known Member
I do the same as Scott. Somethings are just too easy to do by hand and give a better margin of safety than power tools
 

Gahagan

Well-Known Member
you can also find a counter top installer. They have what they call remnant. I got 4 pieces of 3'x2'x2" granite for free.
 

scott.livesey

Dealer - Purveyor
you can also find a counter top installer. They have what they call remnant. I got 4 pieces of 3'x2'x2" granite for free.
that is where i got mine, the shop closed after the economy tanked in 08. checked a small (14"square) piece at work and the surface is dead flat. you can usually find granite tile at big box store for less than $5 for 12"square, but it will be thin so you will need to mount it to something so it wont break. a couple pieces of granite is nice to have around, only surface I know where you can set red hot blade and not have to worry about damaging surface, an advantage over glass. I also use mine with abrasive sheets to check bevel flatness/eveness when doing final blade shaping and sharpening ; and with clover abrasive compound to lap.
 
Last edited:

BossDog

KnifeDogs.com & USAknifemaker.com Owner
Staff member
a platen on a grinder is the last thing you want to use if you want something flat. The belt puckers at both the top and the bottom rounding (slightly I know) over both top and bottom. A disk is several times better than a platen. After that, good technique on a surface plate will take it home.
 

GHEzell

Well-Known Member
a platen on a grinder is the last thing you want to use if you want something flat. The belt puckers at both the top and the bottom rounding (slightly I know) over both top and bottom. A disk is several times better than a platen. After that, good technique on a surface plate will take it home.

I agree, I prefer a disc, followed by hand-sanding on a plate.
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
I use a cheap $200.00 6" x 48" Harbor freight sander and good Hermes or Klingspor 100 Grit belts. I sand length ways and then spin it around and sand it the other length ways and it comes out fine for making handle scales.

You can get away with a 4" x 36" machine as long as it's rigid enough.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 

LRB

Well-Known Member
That is my basic method also Laurence, but I would only recommend those types with a cast iron deck and having a lip on the edges. The ones with a sheet metal deck just don't seem to work that well. At least not for me.
 
Top