Patterns, Templates, Storing, and Marking

Absinthe

Well-Known Member
I am in the process of 6 slipjoints right now, luckily only one of them is multiblade. I have come up with these by printing out paper templates on my computer and supergluing them to the brass/steel/NS then drilling them and cutting them then grinding them to final shape.

Either because I haven't gotten the material clean enough ahead of time, or due to excessive heat buildup without water cooling along the way, I am finding the superglue failing and the template coming up either just in spots or completely. I have been able to superglue it back down multiple times, but that seems less than optimal.

I assume if I came on a design that I was in love with and intended to make it many multiple times I could cut it out on some material that was harder than paper, and do a dychem and scratch trace which may be better than dealing with the superglue thing. I have seen suggested that knife steel was a good thing for doing this. That seems a little unintuitive to me since knife steel is kind of at a premium in my shop as a beginner. But even if I go to Lowes and buy 1018 CRS it seems to be a tad expensive as a "template" material. Is there a better choice?

Also is there a better choice than supergluing the paper printout onto the blade as a template? Something else that would work better with the heat and water?
 

Brad Walker

Well-Known Member
I use either wood or thin sheet metal for my templates. The glue is not holding due to the heat. I use a sharpie to draw on the material. Some people use a scribe to mark their lines. I haven't had great success with that so I stick with the sharpie. That being said, I don't make folders. I can afford to be a little off when removing the excess. I assume, a fold requires much more precision.
 

Absinthe

Well-Known Member
I use either wood or thin sheet metal for my templates. The glue is not holding due to the heat. I use a sharpie to draw on the material. Some people use a scribe to mark their lines. I haven't had great success with that so I stick with the sharpie. That being said, I don't make folders. I can afford to be a little off when removing the excess. I assume, a fold requires much more precision.
I can probably find some thin sheet metal for template material, that could work even if I have to buy it new. Wood I have, perhaps some luan or underlayment.
 
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