Posting wood to the US

cybertrix

Active Member
#1
I was about to post a thread on the pay it forward section and offer a couple of pieces of very old English oak but then I thought about posting to the states from the UK and I have a worry that US customs would not allow it in and destroy it. Do any you have any experience of importing wood, perhaps for stabilising? Any information you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

The Oak is from a barn that was converted to a home, the barn was built in 1780 and by the look of the cross section of one of the beam ends I have it was over 200 years old when it was cut. The colour of the oak is very dark and it looks great in whatever plane it is cut and I would love to send some out to see what a pro knifemaker will make with it.







ATVB
John
 

NJStricker

Well-Known Member
#4
I used to not think too much about it, but in the last century we've lost chestnut, most elms, are losing ash trees, and we are starting to lose American black walnut. All to foreign pests that arrived one way or another. If you are going to send it overseas, stabilize it first.
 

cybertrix

Active Member
#5
I used to not think too much about it, but in the last century we've lost chestnut, most elms, are losing ash trees, and we are starting to lose American black walnut. All to foreign pests that arrived one way or another. If you are going to send it overseas, stabilize it first.
That was my thoughts, I will take your advice and many thanks.

Glad you like the knives, thanks for the comments.
 

BossDog

KnifeDogs.com & USAknifemaker.com Owner
#6
I like the look of that wood. I have a box full of different woods I have collected over the years. I'm not sure I will ever use even half of it but I do like having it and looking it over every now and then.
On the nicer pieces, I worry I could never do it justice.
 

cybertrix

Active Member
#7
I am quite lucky, My brother in law rescued two beam ends for me, the beams are about a foot square by three feet long. The have some quite bad checks in them but for knives there is a lifetime supply. I cut one of the beams up into manageable lumps three years ago and I am still using them.



I love the colour and as you can see some of the checks are very large.



It's only to be expected from such old oak I suppose.
 

Brad Lilly

Moderator and Awards Boss
#8
Here in Canada wood going to certain countries has to be heat treated (sort of a funny term). The wood is heated for a number of cycles to 200 deg depending on the type of tree. So for exporting wood some countries require proof the wood has been heat treated. I don't think you need to do this for going from Canada to the US for obvious reasons, however crossing the pond is a different story. Good luck getting a hold of US customs they don't return e-mail or phone calls. Break the customs law and I'm sure they will get in touch :)

Great looking wood by the way I like the history behind it. It would be cool to see if you could leave a little of the outer weathered side showing, sort of like some makers leave the bark on mammoth ivory.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
#10
We are having to worry more and more about what's on the CITES regulations. My instructor mentioned that it can be a problem to go overseas with an instrument made with Brazilian Rosewood without the proper paperwork.

Doug
 
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