Show us your japanese blades

#7
Thanks Robert, I don't epoxy soak the ito. I don't find it necessary since it stays in place if you fold it and then pull out the slack after each fold. Plus it ruins the feel of the silk when you grip the knife.
 

Erin Burke

Well-Known Member
#9
I don't know that I'd call these Japanese... but maybe Japanese inspired.

You've probably all seen these before.







One on the bench


Erin
 

BladedBonehead

Well-Known Member
#12
For a customer....."Gray Ghost"...5/16" Beta Ti blade, flat ground hardened and tempered with glass bead finish. Engravings in Japanese. Titanium color interference fit guard and gray stingray. epoxied gray cord. Black Kydex sheath...


By goatherder62 at 2012-04-05
 

bubba-san

Well-Known Member
#14
Here Is a Bisen period Wakizashi .This is a new aquisition. The Blade was forged by Okura of Nishigawa in Shibata, Japan. Blade is about 400- 500 years old . needs a basic polish and Tsuka needs refitting . Wooden tsuka has shrunk so it a little loose after 450 years or so . I had to put 2 sets of seppa to take up slack . This Blade was documented by the Tokyo Library in the 1960's . Its in real fine shape for an old wakizashi .... Bubba
 

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#15
Here Is a Bisen period Wakizashi .This is a new aquisition. The Blade was forged by Okura of Nishigawa in Shibata, Japan. Blade is about 400- 500 years old . needs a basic polish and Tsuka needs refitting . Wooden tsuka has shrunk so it a little loose after 450 years or so . I had to put 2 sets of seppa to take up slack . This Blade was documented by the Tokyo Library in the 1960's . Its in real fine shape for an old wakizashi .... Bubba
Dang Bubba!!! That is a real live piece of Japanese History, now I don't know my Japanese history as well as I should, hell, I don't remember American history that well!

My first thought when you said how old it was, "Do you think is was once carried by a Samurai?" The prestige of owning such an incredible piece! WOW, can you imagine how many lives were taken with it? The Samurai of that day were real WARRIORS!! Not with just the sword, they also had to be proficient with the Bow, Staff, and other weapons, AND had to excel in horsemanship. Bubba, and anyone else that knows Japanese history better than I do, I only spent 6 months in Japan, 3 in Okinawa and split 3 months between Mt Fuji and Yakuska Naval Base.

Anywho, Ya done did GOOD , Bubba!
 

bubba-san

Well-Known Member
#16
Hey Buddy , Yes I believe it was used by Samurai , there are several ways to know . The first and most obvious are the sword strikes against spine of blade . Another way , the tsuba is iron , samurai did not usually use soft metal on battle swords .The age is another factor. I was always impressed by the amount of weapons training each Samurai had to excell at. I feel lucky to be the caretaker of such an old piece . Someday it will belong to someone else . I hope they appreciate and take care of it . Remember it is said the sole of the Samurai is in the Blade . It would be enteresting to know all the people who have owned the aword ????
You can't appreciate a good japanese sword unless you hold an antique (Nihonto) in your hands , so light and fast . No wonder they valued thier swords so highly.
I also lived at Yokosuka for a while , great sword and knife shops there ..... Bubba
 

bubba-san

Well-Known Member
#18
You do real nice work , tsukaito is an art in itself .The Battle wrap on several of those pieces is very good . Nice to see someone who uses real Omoto and Ura knots besides myself and 1 other maker . I fuedal japan it took 7 craftsman to complete a sword . Its all I can do to forge and polish blades and cut Saya .I may sub some work out to you if you are up for it ? welcome to Knife dogs . Bubba-san
 
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