Spoke shaves

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
Anyone here use spoke shaves as part of their handle making process? There's a set of three mini spoke shaves for sale here locally. The seller says
They are particularly useful for detailed work such as:
Pattern making, Cabinetmaking, Model making, Carving and Instrument making.
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
Anyone here use spoke shaves as part of their handle making process? There's a set of three mini spoke shaves for sale here locally. The seller says
They are particularly useful for detailed work such as:
Pattern making, Cabinetmaking, Model making, Carving and Instrument making.
Only if you know how to sharpen and hone them. If not sharp, they are useless.
 

Drew Riley

Well-Known Member
If you do a lot of wood handles I can maybe see trying one out, though I normally just shape my handles on my belt grinder. I don't think they'd last too long trying to shape g10, micarta, or other tough materials. Maybe wooden bowie handles?
If I'm doing "hand shaping" I'm probably using rasps, files and sandpaper, but I've never thought about using a spoke shave. If an old wooden wagon ever breaks down in front of your house, you'd sure have the right tool to fix their wheel spokes if needed.... :D
 

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
If you do a lot of wood handles I can maybe see trying one out, though I normally just shape my handles on my belt grinder. I don't think they'd last too long trying to shape g10, micarta, or other tough materials. Maybe wooden bowie handles?
If I'm doing "hand shaping" I'm probably using rasps, files and sandpaper, but I've never thought about using a spoke shave. If an old wooden wagon ever breaks down in front of your house, you'd sure have the right tool to fix their wheel spokes if needed.... :D

I've been doing lmost of my shaping with the belt grinder and sandpaper. One thing that crossed my mind with a spoke shave is it might cut down on some of the dust associated with handle shaping, the grinder especially.
Most of my handle material has been wood lately. My understanding is this particular set is smaller than a normal size spoke shave. I don't think I would use them on anything like G10, etc. Probably ruin the edge.
 

Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
I've been doing lmost of my shaping with the belt grinder and sandpaper. One thing that crossed my mind with a spoke shave is it might cut down on some of the dust associated with handle shaping, the grinder especially.
Most of my handle material has been wood lately. My understanding is this particular set is smaller than a normal size spoke shave. I don't think I would use them on anything like G10, etc. Probably ruin the edge.
If you do the final shaping of your handles after you affix them to the knife the pins will be very troublesome. for the spoke-shave. The only thing I used spoke shaves for was tillering which would be long straight pulls down the length of the bow limb. I do not think the spoke shave would work well on the contours of a handle. All of the shaping on bow risers and handles I did with rasps, files, sanders and sand paper. Cabinet scrapers may work better on contours because they are sold in differing shapes to handle contours.
 

Sean Jones

Well-Known Member
If you do the final shaping of your handles after you affix them to the knife the pins will be very troublesome. for the spoke-shave. The only thing I used spoke shaves for was tillering which would be long straight pulls down the length of the bow limb. I do not think the spoke shave would work well on the contours of a handle. All of the shaping on bow risers and handles I did with rasps, files, sanders and sand paper. Cabinet scrapers may work better on contours because they are sold in differing shapes to handle contours.
Good point about the pins. In general I have been doing the final shaping with pins affixed and glued up. I've thought about using temporary pins and no glue until the very final stages. But even so the pins would be in the way except on the bottom and top.
 
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