Stabbed myself ouch!!!!!!!!

CRAIG1952

Well-Known Member
I was working the other night in my shop. What I was going to do would only take a few minutes, so I opted to not wear my gloves
(What a big mistake!!!!!!) I slipped with a chisel which I had just sharpen the other day. It went into my hand as if it was butter.
I was lucky to have my wife home (she an R.N.) she took one look at it and said your going to need stitches. 5 stitches later , I started a search for Kevlar gloves. I found some at Granger Industrial supply, that were rated a six on the package. But rated a five on there web site. I have been using them religiously ever since. No more doing anything without these gloves. For there rating they sure are comfortable for how thick they are.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/HEXARMOR-Glove-2KWF7?Pid=search
 

Matt Bufford

Well-Known Member
That stinks man.

Good lesson to learn though. It's never the long days in the shop that hurt you. It's always the quick five minutes, when your attention is divided on what you are going to do when you are done!
 

martinjj

Well-Known Member
Don't do that it hurts!!!!! It is always the "ole this will only take a minute" that we pay for! good luck!

Martin
 

Knifemaker.ca

Dealer - Purveyor
Have to add a word of caution about the gloves. It creates a hell of a mess if they get caught in equipment. They clearly have a place in forging and around kilns, but I won't wear them around moving equipment.

Not necessarily right - just my $0.02. :)

rob!
 

Lagrange

Well-Known Member
Though I have never needed stitches, I'd like a dollar for every time I cut myself making knives....
 

CRAIG1952

Well-Known Member
"We talked about those short cuts! No pun intended. Glad your wife was home and your are alright.

Have you melted the Kevlar gloves while grinding?"



I haven't melted them Yet :what!: But, I have noticed that when running my buffer I have a better grip on the knife :biggrin:
If my wife wasn't home, I'd just rap it up and keep going with what I was doing:shush:
 
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Travis Fry

Well-Known Member
Heck, I used to think that bleeding on your blades was part of the process.

Doug
+1. Still is sometimes, but almost never anymore, and not nearly as often as when I started.

I just noticed that I got a paper cut on my finger almost as I was typing this. I guess even accounting can be dangerous...
 
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rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Hey Blood, Sweat & removal of my fears is what Knife Making is all about for me!

Once I get over that hurdle I focus on the next one in my knife making!

Craig, You are due to come by soon! Next week some time? Call me.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com/
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
Those jobs that will take just a minute will get us every time. I don't know how many times when I was working at the clinic that someone would come in and the story I got started something like "I only had one little piece to cut so I figured that I could get by without getting the jig set back up on the machine" or "I was in a hurry and didn't want to lower the saw blade for one cut". My dad was a good one, "I couldn't have missed the start by as much as 1/8" so I figured that I could just bump it back in the shaper to even it out". That one cost him the tips of three fingers and the rest of us had to listen to him saying "I knew better-I KNEW better" for two weeks every time he looked at his hand.

Doug
 

daninghram

Active Member
Have to add a word of caution about the gloves. It creates a hell of a mess if they get caught in equipment. They clearly have a place in forging and around kilns, but I won't wear them around moving equipment.

Not necessarily right - just my $0.02. :)
rob!
That is very good advice, a older guy I worked with lost his thumb when he got his glove caught in the spinning bit on a pionjar drilling holes in stone.
 

CRAIG1952

Well-Known Member
Hey Blood, Sweat & removal of my fears is what Knife Making is all about for me!

Once I get over that hurdle I focus on the next one in my knife making!

Craig, You are due to come by soon! Next week some time? Call me.

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com/
I"LL give it a try, leaving for Alaska in 2 weeks, lot of thing to do, but I'll try my darnest. Need some more lessons and want to see. I also finished the 440 C knives and want your opinion :happy:
 

percy

Well-Known Member
Man you have to be more than careful. Back in 1991 I was making a fillet knife with a 12 inch blade I was almost done just a little polishing left. The thing wobbled a little while buffing it and flung out of my hand and and stuck in my right leg about 3 inches above the knee. It stuck so hard I could not even pull it out of the bone, man it hurt like leavings for sure. Luckey a friend was just about to my shop and when he came in blood was going everywhere. I was there by myself, no cell phone back then either. He took me to the emergency room and they pulled it out and stitched me up. Worst cut I ever had. Please be careful out there guys,, SAFETY IS COMMON SENSE, if you have no sommon sense you will not be safe no matter what you buy for safety.

Percy
 

rhinoknives

Well-Known Member
Man you have to be more than careful. Back in 1991 I was making a fillet knife with a 12 inch blade I was almost done just a little polishing left. The thing wobbled a little while buffing it and flung out of my hand and and stuck in my right leg about 3 inches above the knee. It stuck so hard I could not even pull it out of the bone, man it hurt like leavings for sure. Luckey a friend was just about to my shop and when he came in blood was going everywhere. I was there by myself, no cell phone back then either. He took me to the emergency room and they pulled it out and stitched me up. Worst cut I ever had. Please be careful out there guys,, SAFETY IS COMMON SENSE, if you have no sommon sense you will not be safe no matter what you buy for safety.

Percy
Hello Percy,
I wear a very large & long Full thickness Cow hide shop apron for this very reason.
Also I do not make mirror polished blades.

I use my Baldor Buffer for taking off the burr after I sharpen. Still that thing Scares the Cr@p of of me!

Percy.
I suggest that you share this unfortunate accident in the "Shop Tips" Thread that Boss Dog started here. Many New makers are reading that and perhaps you can help them avoid this kind of trip to the E.R.

I myself, Never Talk to anyone while I am on the buffer and it's very important that you don't buff higher than about 110 degree mark.
You want the piece thrown down and back if you lose it!

When I met the Late Bob Loveless at his shop a few years back. one of the pearls of wisdom he said was, That Buffer is the most Dangerous piece of equipment in the shop!

Laurence

www.rhinoknives.com
 

Drew Riley

Well-Known Member
Have to add a word of caution about the gloves. It creates a hell of a mess if they get caught in equipment. They clearly have a place in forging and around kilns, but I won't wear them around moving equipment.

Not necessarily right - just my $0.02. :)

rob!
It absolutely blows my mind how many people think it's not only safer, but a normal and accepted practice to wear gloves around a drill press. It absolutely kills me when I see them brush the swarf off of a moving bit with a gloved hand as well.

Are you kidding me??

I'll take the occasional splinters and slivers over broken or torn off fingers any day.

It if rotates, spins, turns, or has belt, chain, or gears, you shouldn't be wearing loose clothes, jewelry, OR gloves. There are VERY few exceptions to this rule, and most, if not all of them invovle gloves that will tear away if caught.

That's the same reason I don't wear rings or buckle/clasp type watch bands.
 
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