Strongest Epoxy On The Planet

cappaletti

Well-Known Member
In that "Wood in the Kitchen" test that I did, I was focused on treatments for the wood - but decided to see how Loctite E-120HP would do. E-120HP al$o require$ a $pecial plunger/applicator $eparate from the glue tube. I ground the 5160 bars to maybe 400 grit? and cleaned them with acetone. Which blocks popped off in my torture tests seemed to have little to do with whether that particular wood block was oil-free - more to do with whether the particular block took on water and warped. Bizarre thing: one of the best performers was plain safflower oil.

Makes me curious about whether some glues aren't as sensitive to having a pristine surface to bond with. I would have though that the blocks with undried oils would have popped off pretty easily.

Eric Ochs did a similar handle material torture test - used Devcon 2 ton for the glue - and had the blocks popping off after a few months (admittedly it was a nasty test - but that's how you find out things in a short period of time) here's the link: http://www.ochssherworx.com/index_files/Page513.htm

Caffrey mentioned in a post that most retail epoxy has a hold life of just a few years - while West systems is rated for 5 year shelf life and 25 year hold life... and Acraglass is rated for 10 year shelf life and 50 year hold life.

Gene - thanks for the note on K & G epoxy - do you have a feel for how well it keeps a bond over the years? They say it has "unbelievable" strength - is it up there with JB Weld?

Great thread!! Looking forward to seeing more comments...

Michael..I know that Jim Ferguson uses the K & G epoxy and swears by it..I myself have the K & G epoxy but haven't used it yet cause I've got severals other brands to use up first...
 
M

MarkSky

Guest
I work in the aircraft industry,and we use all types of epoxies for gluing all types of materials.Most of the time we use Locktite,but as I have seen,sometimes it is a matter of price and availability not performance,eventhough Locktite has some very good epoxies.We use some stuff called Sealant(not a brand,but type) for adhering materials,especially metals together that also keeps moisture out.This stuff is super strong(depending on which is used of course)and is very flexible,and WILL NOTalow moisture in.I've used it myself for varying types of work,even around the house, and it works,but is very smelly(VERY)and is also VERY messy.It will ruin clothes immediately! I am not sure of the brand or composition,but I will find out if you wish and post.We are currently making our own at work(MAJOR AIRLINE) so it must not be too hard to obtain.Price,Don't know,but will see if I can find out.Not your usual epoxies used or talked about,thought it might interest you though,to see something not commonly known or used outside industry.BY the way,this stuff lasts FOREVER,I've seen planes come in,and taken apart parts that have been Sealed/glued with this stuff over 30YRS! and It took a very big hammer and chisel to get it apart!
 
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