Took the plung

Freds Edge

Well-Known Member
Took my first step to becoming a hot metal pusher , bought a 155 lb Peter Wright anvil , pix's attached. Next step is building a forge.IMG_0346.jpgIMG_0347.jpgIMG_0351.jpg
 

Ed of all trades

Well-Known Member
Nice one, I have a 90 lb Peter Wright and love it, just wish it was bigger. Some don't like them because they ring pretty loud if not tied down well. I love mine and would like to find one the size of yours. Ed
 

Freds Edge

Well-Known Member
Does anyone have any input on resurfacing my new old anvil, its relatively flat front to back but has a crown side to side . My thought was to take it to a friend who has a large machine shop and have him surface grind the top , my surface grinder does not have the height.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
That picture from the horn end makes it look like it has a steel face welded to an iron body. If that is the case I wouldn't do any grinding on it.

Doug
 

cliffrat

Active Member
I think Doug is correct about the face plate welded to the cast body, but I don't know why that would be cause to not grind it down. Unless the crown is so steep that making it flat would produce a very thin top plate. It looks like the divots in the face are more of a problem. I think (someone correct me if I'm wrong) you can take that to a reputable welding or blacksmith shop and they could fill in those divots with an appropriate metal. Then, if the crown isn't too steep, you could have your buddy resurface it. It looks like the top plate goes down to the step. How big is the crown compared to the depth of the step? Oh, yeah. Build a ribbon burner forge. You won't regret it.
 

Freds Edge

Well-Known Member
Thanks guys , my understanding is that this anvil is a forged anvil with a 1/2 '' plate forged welded to the top. After laying a straight edge length wise and side to side it appears that 3/32 will clean the top flat and remove most all the dings. I will post pix's of the results.
 
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