Trizact Belts

Randy Lucius

Well-Known Member
Found it.
Product Description 3M™Trizact™CF 347FCpolishing belts are specifically designed for high-pressure, machinepolishing operations. This product is designed to be run wet or dry and does have a grinding aid. Storage Store at 16 °C – 26 °C and 35-50 % relative humidity in its original box on “first-in - first-out” cycle.
 

Owl

Gold Membership
the 347FC series can be used wet.
I ordered some last month and they work fine with my misting system.
 

REK Knives

Well-Known Member
I use 337dc gator trizacts soaking wet and have for years without issues.

I've been wanting to try those new ones though, just for fun. But I doubt they will perform better!
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
Trizacts at True Grit. Here
Just a heads up with that variety of Trizact belts..... the are intended for "full coverage" grinding....meaning that you want the steel/materials to fully cover the belt when using. If you attempt to do grind a thin cross section, say like trying to grind lengthwise on a blade's spine, or other thin width, it will cut into the grain deeply....then if you attempt to use that belt to grind the primary bevels of a blade, it will leave what I call "worm tracks" across the blade.... sort of a winding, protruding line across the flat.
Personally, the only thing I use these belts for anymore, is on my surface grinder, and to a finer point, only in those cases where the size of steel is larger then the width of the belt.
Speaking from personal experience, these are the only variety of Trizact belts that survive being wet.

Although more expensive, I personally like the Norton Norax U936 belts far more then any variety of Trizact belts..... but everybody has their personal favorites, for various reasons, so I think each individual needs to try various belts, and use whatever works best for themselves. ;)
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
Just a heads up with that variety of Trizact belts..... the are intended for "full coverage" grinding....meaning that you want the steel/materials to fully cover the belt when using. If you attempt to do grind a thin cross section, say like trying to grind lengthwise on a blade's spine, or other thin width, it will cut into the grain deeply....then if you attempt to use that belt to grind the primary bevels of a blade, it will leave what I call "worm tracks" across the blade.... sort of a winding, protruding line across the flat.
Personally, the only thing I use these belts for anymore, is on my surface grinder, and to a finer point, only in those cases where the size of steel is larger then the width of the belt.
Speaking from personal experience, these are the only variety of Trizact belts that survive being wet.

Although more expensive, I personally like the Norton Norax U936 belts far more then any variety of Trizact belts..... but everybody has their personal favorites, for various reasons, so I think each individual needs to try various belts, and use whatever works best for themselves. ;)
I agree with Ed on the Trizacts. They have a place.....but very limited. Mine are mostly on my surface grinder too.

Pay good attention to Ed's "full coverage" grinding comment. Spot on.
 

Randy Lucius

Well-Known Member
I use them to remove scratches post heat treat grinding and prior to hand sanding. Post heat treat my belt progression is 120, 220, A45 and A30. What are you guys doing?
 

Greg Rice

Well-Known Member
I need to come and watch one of you master craftsmen do this grind work on a blade. I bet I would learn so much.
 

vlegski

Active Member
Greg. Don't wait. Find the bladesmiths in your area. If you can SAFELY (the covid) its worth it.. even if its costs bucks. I still struggle with seeming simple things that a class would have cured in a couple hours. Several years ago I procrastinated on a class Ed. That was a big mistake. In another instance it was a gathering with master bladesmiths. The virus killed that. Youve got a lot of good bladesmiths in Texas. Take advantage of their experience when you can.
 

Owl

Gold Membership
I was amazed at how much faster I learned when I had an instructor standing with me at the grinder.
Books and YT videos are OK but it just isn't nearly as good as in person teaching.
If you can take a class or work with a bladesmith in your area it will boost you way up on the learning curve.
I took some of the knife making classes at Montgomery Community College in Troy, NC a few years ago.
The cost was very reasonable and I thought the instruction was top notch.
 
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