Very new. Please help

#1
I am interested in learning how to make knives but have no idea where to start. I have been reading threads on here for a few days and have gained alot of knowledge. I know that I will probably start with stock removal. I want to start with something small. Other than that I do not know what tools I need or where to start. Forge,oven,kiln for heat treating. What kind of grinder, sander ect. Any advice would be much appreciated.
 

Austin Thrasher

Well-Known Member
#3
Alec Steele is also very entertaining. He does have some instructional videos but a lot of it is just entertaining and if you learn anything it’s by observation but still very fun to watch and incredible skill for such a young age.
 

Gliden07

Well-Known Member
#5
I am interested in learning how to make knives but have no idea where to start. I have been reading threads on here for a few days and have gained alot of knowledge. I know that I will probably start with stock removal. I want to start with something small. Other than that I do not know what tools I need or where to start. Forge,oven,kiln for heat treating. What kind of grinder, sander ect. Any advice would be much appreciated.
Good book and to keep costs under control is "The $50 Knife Shop" GREAT BOOK. Gives good advise on differant tools what you need and many low cost options for tools! The one brick Forge was worth the price of the book alone. Another great inexpensive tool is a file guide (You-Tube is your friend for this easy to make tool). The guide can make excellent knives Kevin Zito *member on here) makes Great looking knives with one. My list would be, file guide, files, decent vise, C clamps, drill with various bits, lots of sandpaper, hacksaw and blades, 1 brick forge and toaster oven. If you raid your cellar and shop at some of the thrift stores in your area you should be able to assemble this for $100-$150 for everything! You can build any type of knife with this set up except the biggest Bowies and Swords! And dont forget to ask the members on here for lots of help! Lots of talented people on this forum! PS I'm not one of them!! LOL!!
 
#10
The only thing I have to add is maybe list your city and state because you will learn exponentially faster if you have someone to learn from. There are many great and generous knife makers here one MAY be willing to help you.
 
#13
A little more help needed guys. I am going to be making a drop point hunter out of 1084 1.25x0.125. I will be filing the entire thing including the bevles. Now tell me if I am over thinking things; staying in the machinist mind set too much. To keep my bevel right I would need to file 0.03125 on either side for my initial grind leaving 0.0625 on the edge for heat threat. I want to take my grind back 1" so that will make my angle approximately 1.8°. After heat treat I will have 0.0625 to cut a 10° edge on either side for my sharpening. The first question is the 0.0625 enough meat for the heat treat to keep from cracking? The second question is, is that angle too shallow? Is this doable?
 
#14
Yes, you are overthinking it. Your thought process is perfect but the way to make it happen is simple and practical.

Once the blade shape is cut out (profiled):

Use layout fluid to darken your edge as well as the spine. Using a height gauge measure your thickness and then set the height to 1/2 that +.010

Mark the edge and spine from both sides. You’ll end up with a double line .020” apart. That’s all the thickness you need at the edge for heat treat.

Determine how high you want your bevels. Use a set of cheap calipers set to that height and run them along the edge. This will scribe a line for the top of your bevels.

Now file until your bevels meet the scribed lines. Draw filing works best imo.
 
#15
Yes, you are overthinking it. Your thought process is perfect but the way to make it happen is simple and practical.

Once the blade shape is cut out (profiled):

Use layout fluid to darken your edge as well as the spine. Using a height gauge measure your thickness and then set the height to 1/2 that +.010

Mark the edge and spine from both sides. You’ll end up with a double line .020” apart. That’s all the thickness you need at the edge for heat treat.

Determine how high you want your bevels. Use a set of cheap calipers set to that height and run them along the edge. This will scribe a line for the top of your bevels.

Now file until your bevels meet the scribed lines. Draw filing works best imo.
Thank you sir.
 
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