Band saw blades

Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
Have hit a bit of a hitch with my new bandsaw in that the saw stalled a couple of times and even though I could hit the stop switch within a couple of seconds it damaged the capacitor start so after a yarn with the guys where I bought it I took it back in for them to do a detailed problem solve as they had been the company that specialised in bandsaw blades before selling the business and moving into the tool import and retail.
They have said I really need a narrower and finer tpi blade than the 1/2 wide 14tpi blade for the vertical cutting as I am doing for the knife blanks and I cant get the narrow finer tpi blade here in NZ.
Are any of you using a 18 tpi x 1/4 inch wide blade on your saws as that is the reccomendation of the bandsaw expert here. He says that while the saw is able to be used vertical it is really designed as a horrizontal machine.

Have spoken to the electrician and I may look at putting a better motor on it as well

So the main consideration is being able to source a 1/4 in wide 18tpi blade at this stage
 

DanF

Well-Known Member
In the beginning, my saw stalled when I was trying to cut a too-agressive curve for the blade and saw's abilities. I thought about trying a 1/4" blade, but feared it might not be beefy enough. I lose some productivity by doing more relief cuts in the curves, but it stopped the binding (this may be something you have already tried).
If there is a blade in the configuration you mention Starrett or Lennox should maybe have them?
 

Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
If there is a blade in the configuration you mention Starrett or Lennox should maybe have them?
I have contacted Starret and asked about a 3/8 x 18 tpi blade as a slightly beefier option than the 1/4 inch but narrower that the 1/2inch so should be able to cut without too many relief cuts which take time.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
I only run 1/2 inch blades. Here’s a photo of the one I use. The description says 18tpi but in actuality it is a 14-18tpi variable pitch with no raker. It’s .020 thick. Cuts like butter.

On the highest speed setting I can stall my saw if I try to cut too sharp a curve. The solution is to cut a less accurate radius and simply remove the excess at the grinder.

On a slower speed setting you’ll have more torque.

89588A36-47D8-499D-8397-C8CCE29ABD3D.jpeg
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
Luckily I’ve got my power cord run through a foot switch. As soon as it stalls I simply lift my foot. Often enough a cut-off chip falls down into the guide rollers and will stall the saw. That’s one more good reason for a foot switch.

As far as the capacitor blowing, I suppose I’ve been lucky. Either my luck is due to the foot switch or the 110V line voltage, but I cannot say. Honestly, I’ve been hoping this motor would die for several years now because my original plan was to replace it with a 3-phase motor and run the saw off a VFD for infinite speed control. The little bugger won’t die and my inner skinflint refuses to replace a working motor.
 

bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
On my saw it seems like it doesn't stall but rather it throws the blade off. my on - off switch is on the side where I sit. I have a folded up painter tarp I sit on that falls over on the switch, when I sense the saw's about to throw up I kind of roll my hip to the right and it throws the switch off. a foot pedal would be ideal but I don't have one of those yet.
My blades are pretty much the same John uses.
 

IanF

Well-Known Member
I’ve never had a problem with 1/2 inch blades once I bought good quality ones. Before that blades jumping off were normal - now it is very rare indeed. Locally in Australia I get my bimetal blades from McDiven saws - they may well ship to NZ and are probably worth a call?
 

Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
I have an email away to Starret so will see if I get a reply. They can ship to my agent in Illinois and he can include it in one of my regular packages of supplies so that will be more convenient than a one off shipping charge from AU Ian
 

Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
Also...if at all possible lay the stock down. If cutting multiples, c clamp them together. Standing bladestock vertical is very hard on the blade.
 

Von Gruff

KNIFE MAKER
Also...if at all possible lay the stock down. If cutting multiples, c clamp them together. Standing bladestock vertical is very hard on the blade.
All blade stock is laid flat on the table with the saw set upright
Yiwky3fl.jpg
 

Mark Knapp

Dealer - Purveyor
I sell 1/4 X14/18 bi-metal band saw blades as do many suppliers closer to you, but I'm afraid you need a better saw my friend. Any saw that can't do what you are asking it to do is going to be just a continuous source of frustration for you. I own and operate a band blade weld shop and saw technician in my area. What is the horse power on your saw?
 
Last edited:

Mark Knapp

Dealer - Purveyor
1/2 horse is on the week side. 3/4 hrs. would be a minimum. 1/4 inch wide blades are very hard to control for cutting blade blanks unless you have a very good saw.

A 1/2 inch bi-metal blade with a 14/18 pitch would be your best bet for blade blanks. That saw would not be a good one for handle material, it runs too slow. Unless you have a saw that can switch from wood cutting speeds (1000 + surface feet per minute) to metal cutting speeds (50 to 200 sftpm) you will need a saw for both.

For handle material, 1/4 wide blades would be fine, about 14 teeth per inch, bi-metal for carbon fiber and 6 tpi for wood.
 
Top