Tru Oil tip

Owl

Gold Membership
I've started using Teak oil on most of my knives. It is designed for oily woods, and will even absorb into desert ironwood and african blackwood. It seals both stabilized woods and oily woods well. Not as shiny as Tru-oil, but I'm moving away from the really shiny look.
How many coats of Teak oil are you using?
 

Casey Brown

Well-Known Member
How many coats of Teak oil are you using?
Depends. You get different looks with different treatments. I have soaked handles for up to an hour in heated teak oil to let the oil fully saturate the handle, but this also really darkens the wood. After, I let it dry, and I may put on a couple of more coats to really seal the top surface. Then I will let it cure overnight before I do any other surface work. I got this from another maker that recommended this treatment, and I like it.
 

Casey Brown

Well-Known Member
Gotcha. No problem. And what is wrong with handles looking like furnishings?
I just mean I don't want my handles to look like they have a thick layer of polyurethane on them. I like the look of natural wood, so I don't want to add too much to that. Just my personal preference, though.
 

J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
The article didn't list any sources or links to actual scientific tests or data that I could find. Maybe I missed it?

But if not, it's just an opinion piece based on the author's results and/or preferences, and the author is asking readers to just take his word for it.

I've used Watco brand teak oil for many years and it gives excellent results FOR ME in what I'm after in a knife handle.

Puddles of it on my bench dry smooth and completely hard in a few hours. It doesn't dry clear but it doesn't significantly darken or discolor woods that I've seen.

I really couldn't care less if it comes from teak or not or is intended for teak or not.

Thanks for the article Bruce. It was interesting. I'm not knocking you for posting it, or the author either for that matter. He did seem down on teak oil, which is his choice. I like it for my needs (at least the watco brand).
 

Casey Brown

Well-Known Member
The article didn't list any sources or links to actual scientific tests or data that I could find. Maybe I missed it?

But if not, it's just an opinion piece based on the author's results and/or preferences, and the author is asking readers to just take his word for it.

I've used Watco brand teak oil for many years and it gives excellent results FOR ME in what I'm after in a knife handle.

Puddles of it on my bench dry smooth and completely hard in a few hours. It doesn't dry clear but it doesn't significantly darken or discolor woods that I've seen.

I really couldn't care less if it comes from teak or not or is intended for teak or not.

Thanks for the article Bruce. It was interesting. I'm not knocking you for posting it, or the author either for that matter. He did seem down on teak oil, which is his choice. I like it for my needs (at least the watco brand).
Sounds like we are on the same page on this. I've become a big fan of it.

Sorry guys. I did not mean to hijack this thread about Tru-oil.
 

MTBob

Well-Known Member
I just sucked some Tru Oil into a syringe to see if that blocks the air and stops the hardening process. Toothpick in the hole.
1611271024200.png
Notice the entrained air bubbles - I think that's the culprit causing early hardening. I'll let this settle over night and see if all the air rises to the top so it can be purged. This might work, so long as the toothpick doesn't get glued into the hole and break off - may need a better cap. My oil is thick and beginning to harden, so this test may not work. I would think new oil would allow the bubbles to dissipate quickly.
1611271143147.png
 

tkroenlein

Well-Known Member
The article didn't list any sources or links to actual scientific tests or data that I could find. Maybe I missed it?

But if not, it's just an opinion piece based on the author's results and/or preferences, and the author is asking readers to just take his word for it.

I've used Watco brand teak oil for many years and it gives excellent results FOR ME in what I'm after in a knife handle.

Puddles of it on my bench dry smooth and completely hard in a few hours. It doesn't dry clear but it doesn't significantly darken or discolor woods that I've seen.

I really couldn't care less if it comes from teak or not or is intended for teak or not.

Thanks for the article Bruce. It was interesting. I'm not knocking you for posting it, or the author either for that matter. He did seem down on teak oil, which is his choice. I like it for my needs (at least the watco brand).
I've read better (seemingly more objective) versions of the same information. It does appear true that there is no "standard" for what constitutes Teak oil, but we're sure it isn't collected like maple syrup.

It is interesting that the Watco mentioned by several here, and the Minwax that I've been using are both listed as suspected oil/varnish mixtures. That seems about right with the fast dry time and finishing qualities. I like it very much compared to anything else I've used.
 

bladegrinder

Well-Known Member
One trick I use to keep air out of a bottle of tru oil is put glass marbles in it as I use it, they displace the air and seems to work pretty good. I also cut it with mineral spirits when I use it, which really isn't that often.
 

Chris Railey

KNIFE MAKER
I've read better (seemingly more objective) versions of the same information. It does appear true that there is no "standard" for what constitutes Teak oil, but we're sure it isn't collected like maple syrup.

It is interesting that the Watco mentioned by several here, and the Minwax that I've been using are both listed as suspected oil/varnish mixtures. That seems about right with the fast dry time and finishing qualities. I like it very much compared to anything else I've used.

Typically how long does a coat take to dry?
 

Heikki

KNIFE MAKER
For those of you using teak oil, is it applied the same as Tru Oil, rubbed in with a finger and wiped off, repeat as needed?
 

tkroenlein

Well-Known Member
For those of you using teak oil, is it applied the same as Tru Oil, rubbed in with a finger and wiped off, repeat as needed?
You all should rely on what just about any other maker does besides me cuz I don't do a lot of wood. But I rub as much in the first coat as I can with a terry cloth type rag. It penetrates better that tru oil and you can get a good bit more to take IMO. But when the first coat is done rub rub rubbed in, it's about half dry. When fully dried, I buff lightly with 0000 and rub another coat pretty much dry, repeat... After the first coat it doesn't take up much at all. I always finish with 0000 for a satin finish.
 
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