What's going on in your shop?

Ty Adams

KNIFE MAKER
The devil's in the details. Working on dialing in the plunge lines, and straightening out the front of the ricasso.
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CJKnives

Well-Known Member
A little final hand sanding and a little polishing on this handle before I get started on the sheath.
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Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
I got the profiling done on some more stainless blades that the holes need drilled and the flats cleaned up...once these are ready for heat treat I think that will make 19 that I will send out to peters which should keep me busy for a long tim.
Then I have a large hunter Im working on that will sport Bocote scales and a hand rubbed finish.
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Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk

Hi Justin,

I love the grain on that hunter. I bought some bocote for the wild grain and color and then floundered on the finish for a while. I finally found a method of finish that I liked. I bought some organic (lol...yes they use it for coating candies...) Carnuba wax flakes and two tiny crock-pots. I hung the wood in an empty crock-pot till it was warm/hot then I hung it in the other pot in melted Carnuba for an hour or so. then moved it back to the other pot on warm to drip off extra Carnuba. Then with a clean dry buffing wheel I buffed it to a nice sheen and it seems very hard. It was about $35 for this experiment. I still want to do some tests on the finish but I suspect it will hold up fine. I know you probably have a good method but thought I'd share this one. I will try this on other "greasy" woods when I have time....
 

CJKnives

Well-Known Member
Beautiful! Do you dye each piece of leather to get that cool banding look?

Thank you! I really like the way it's turning out so far.
No, I don't dye the leather at all. The variations in color are just natural variations in the color of the leather and also where the epoxy soaked into the leather.
 

Ty Adams

KNIFE MAKER
Tonight's work... Sanding everything nice and flat on the granite slab. Right now everything is at a dirty 400 grit. If everything goes well I'll start etching tomorrow night to bring out the hamon.
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John Wilson

Well-Known Member
that really turned out nice. Is that a Scandi grind all the way to the edge, or is there a tiny secondary bevel there at the edge?
 

Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
Wouldn't every scandi grind have a tiny bevel from sharpening or is a scandi brought to sharp by the grind itself? AND....is every scandi a hollow grind or straight grind? I have only been doing flat/straight grinds so pardon my ignorance.
 

CJKnives

Well-Known Member
Wouldn't every scandi grind have a tiny bevel from sharpening or is a scandi brought to sharp by the grind itself? AND....is every scandi a hollow grind or straight grind? I have only been doing flat/straight grinds so pardon my ignorance.

Scandi grind are typically flat grinds that run all the way to the edge. A true Scandi grind has no secondary bevel - just one large bevel that extends to the edge and therefore creates the cutting edge. However most everyone I know that does Scandi grinds - do then with a small or even a micro secondary bevel.
 

John Wilson

Well-Known Member
Agreed. A scandi that is effectively a zero grind may be traditional, but they are a pain to sharpen without trashing the looks of the finish. A good beater knife with a scandi grind is easy to sharpen- you don't need to care about angles since you lay the flat on the stone and go to town. But to get the bevel looking good again is a mighty task. A tiny secondary bevel never hurt anybody.
 

CJKnives

Well-Known Member
Agreed. A scandi that is effectively a zero grind may be traditional, but they are a pain to sharpen without trashing the looks of the finish. A good beater knife with a scandi grind is easy to sharpen- you don't need to care about angles since you lay the flat on the stone and go to town. But to get the bevel looking good again is a mighty task. A tiny secondary bevel never hurt anybody.

Amen brother! Well said!
 
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