seved
Joined
Likes
5

Profile posts Latest activity Postings About

  • Any type of black, dark brown, or dyed hardwood such as Walnut or Maple, and sometimes they used Buffalo Horn. The handles did not have any decoration...just the two large brass rivots. The knife is looking very good.
    No loom is used...it is all done "free handed" and the different types of beading techniques were taught to me when I was young. I would suggest you order a book on Native American beadwork, that shows the different types of stitchwork, such as Lazy Stitch and Applique Stitch (Flatwork), which are the two most popular for flat beadwork on leather (buckskin), then there is Brick Stitch, Peyote Stitch, etc, which is used for beading on round objects, like wooden handles, keychains, dance sticks, canes, etc. Now there is a type of beadwork known as Loom Beading, but it is used mostly for belts and hatbands, and not for knife sheaths.
    The shape in your drawing is correct for a Scalper. Like I said, the tang usually went half way through the handle, but if you looked down at the handle from above you could see the tang...it was not hidden. They were pinned in two or three places with brass pins. I had mine specifically made as a full tang because I wanted a heavier knife.
    Most scalpers were not full tangs...they were 1/2 tangs, with usually 2 or 3 pins. Metal would go half way through the handle, and be pinned.
    The originals did not have any etching on them, so in my opinion, I wouldn't do it if you want it to be authentic looking.
    Looking very good, my friend. Looking forward to seeing it completely finished. I think you should keep this one as your personal knife...don't sell it.
    Here in the states, delivery time is usually 3-4 days, but to get where you live I have no idea. Did you receive a conformation Email showing your purchase and when it was sent? If not, I would call Crazy Crow and find out.
  • Loading…
  • Loading…
  • Loading…
Top