Can the shavings from brake lathe turning

A.W.Stovall

Well-Known Member
rotors drums can that stuff be used for anything I know its not hard enough for a blade , but can it be melted and used for bolsters and such? And my other question is I have acess to ball bearings and races I believe they are made of 5160 steel how hard would it be to make that suff usefull I dont have a power hammer just elbows and arms.
Thanks Anthony:rolleyes:
 

Wayne Coe

Forum Owner - Moderator
Ball bearings and their races are usually 52100. Ed Fowler touts it as the best steel for knives. Hard stuff. 1% carbon simple steel or 100 points.

I have not made any "canned damascus" but someone else may be able to give you information. I would think that you need to know what break drums and rotors are made of and I would be concerned about impurities.
 

Wayne Coe

Forum Owner - Moderator
That is what I thought. Then pour the grindings in a metal container, about 1' square, weld it closed, weld a chain on it and you have a good boat anchor.:haha:
 

A.W.Stovall

Well-Known Member
I know it can't be used as a blade but can it be used for bolsters ,guards and such? Kind of like wrought iron what is the difference im pretty new to this and am in the processof building a forge, just want some free metal to play around with.
Thanks Anthony
 

McClellan Made Blades

Well-Known Member
A.W.
There are some things you can do to 'play" around with these off castings. I'm no expert, but I plan on using the scraps, shavings and grit from making my knives to make a conglomeration damascus. With the aid of some good flux I think (key word there) I can add my scrap stuff to a hot piece of steel and forge weld it into the steel. It might make a decent pattern, it might not. BUT, that is the fun of experimenting with this stuff, if you know it's iron, or mild steel. It could be used for the spine of a blade and better quality knife steel could be forged in for the edge, similar to what the Japanese do for the Katanas. I think, using your imagination is the key, but what I strongly recommend, is once you do make a blade from it, test it to failure. Meaning use it cutting, prying, chopping, anything you can think of to abuse it to death. If it holds up to all of that, put it in a vise and with proper safety equipment and a cheater bar bend it 90 degrees. If it still holds up after that you might have something that could be a decent blade. Be objective, in all of your testing and document your tests. Video is a good idea, as well as recording your data on paper, such as, "it made xxxx amount of cardbord cuts before tearing or snagging". The bottom line is have fun with it, use your creativity, learn all you can about making damascus. Before you get all excited, do know that making damascus by hand and hammer is not for the faint of heart, it is A LOT of hard WORK! Not to mention getting good forge welds by hand is tough, but it can be done. I recommend a book by Dr. Jim Hrisoulas, " The Complete Blade Smith", he has done some amazing work and does a lot of it by hand. Have fun, Rex
 

JatMat

Well-Known Member
If all else fails, put it around your azaleas and or pecan trees. Both love iron and the cast iron shavings get iron into the soil and you will be surprised with the increased yields of the trees and added blooms of the azaleas.
Jim
 

JatMat

Well-Known Member
I would not know about the 440, But I KNOW about increased yields and blooms using the iron shavings.
 

SBuzek

Well-Known Member
A W
Since your in TX like me if you have St.Agustine grass in your yard it will love the exta iron.The grass in front of my shop is the greenest in the yard.I also putt it around my pecan trees.
Stan
 
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