New knife that needs critique

Ember Knives

Well-Known Member
Hello all, this is my most recent knife finished. It is the ninth for me I think. I have realized from another thread that most of the points on my knives are too square at the tip. Handle is Desert Ironwood, steel is 1080, flat grind, a little under 8 inches OAL. Please critique. On another note, the sheath I made for it will have to be redone, as the belt loop stitches were cut from inserting the blade. I knew that it could happen, but I thought that it wouldn't. Does anyone have any suggestions concerning that, or a good tutorial they could point me to for sheaths? Thanks!DSC_0552.JPGDSC_0554.JPGKnife.JPG
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
Speaking to the knife, I would say you're doing well, but need attention design, and more so to detail. The "belly" of the blade to the tip should be a bit flatter (not such a big roll)..as it is, the use of the tip/point is very limited.
Next, the detail in the plunge cuts.... they are very washed out.....they should be more crisp and clean. It's also evident to me that you sanded on the blade, and the blade/handle material juncture after installing the handle(s).... all that work should be done prior to installing handles.... otherwise it creates issues, and is always evident.
Handle pins are not spaced evenly in either the horizontal or vertical planes. That's something that takes time and forethought.... especially with the pin at the front of the handle, and finger notches/rolls.

When it comes to the sheath, Gene nailed it with recessing stitches. That's something you ALWAYS need to do with any exposed stitches on a sheath's interior. I also recess stitches on the exterior of all sheaths....because there's always the chance for sheaths to be rubbed/scraped on brush, bushes, ect. in the field.
 

mike miller

KNIFE MAKER
I am not a fan of that thin section of wood on the handle in front of the finger groove. To me it may be a potential problem for breaking down the road.I like a more rounded front of the handle keeping every thing as big as possible.

Just my 2 cents and opinions differ.
 
Recessing the stitches is the easiest way, and makes a neat job. I re-stain the recess slot before stitching. Tandy makes an inexpensive reloadable felt tip pen that you can add your dye to. For black, you can just use a sharpie pen.
 

Ember Knives

Well-Known Member
Thank you everyone!

GeneK: I'm guessing you just use a swivel knife or something to cut the flap? I think I will try this technique.

Ed: Is it necessary to get a file guide to keep my plunge lines crisp.

One Armed: When I started this knife I added the jimping. By this time I probably would not do it again. But it is a lot of fun doing file work!

I think one of my problems was that I did a lot of altercations on the handle, after I had put in the pins, which affected how far the pins are away from the edge of the handle.
 

Gene Kimmi

KNIFE MAKER
Thank you everyone!

GeneK: I'm guessing you just use a swivel knife or something to cut the flap? I think I will try this technique.

I cut the flap with a utility knife. Leather guys will cringe at this, but after making close to 100 sheaths, I don't own a swivel knife. I actually use my little band saw to cut a lot of my leather.
 

Doug Lester

Well-Known Member
The point is going to depend on what you want the knife for. To me that broad rounded point would make a great skinner that is less likely to pierce the hide than a blade with a more acute point.

As far as cutting away stained leather for a stitching groove, I avoid it by staining the sheath after stitching. Then I burnish the edge of the sheath using gum tragacanth and applying a leather dressing all over.

Doug
 
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