What's going on in your shop?

JeremyBartlett

Well-Known Member
Dude that's beautiful. Will 5160 hamon like this


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
5160 is a deep hardening steel, if you do an edge quench you can get a little line, but for active hamons with lots of detail use shallow hardening steels such as 1075, 1084, 1095 and W2

Sent from my SM-N915V using Tapatalk
 

Kevin Zito

KNIFE MAKER
5160 is a deep hardening steel, if you do an edge quench you can get a little line, but for active hamons with lots of detail use shallow hardening steels such as 1075, 1084, 1095 and W2

Sent from my SM-N915V using Tapatalk
Gotcha! Thanks! I'm holding a piece of 1095 (compliments of my bro DeMo) in my hands as I type. I'm gonna make a simple skinner, with hamon (lol... prob will be a disaster). I'm focusing on simplicity and fit and finish. Please, guys, let me know if the hamon is too much for me at this time. Will post pics as they come.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
I wouldn't say it's too much....we all gotta start somewhere. That being said, creating/exposing a hamon can be tricky at times...if it doesn't work out this time, use it as a learning experience and keep trying. It took me several blades before I figured out all the techniques I needed to achieve a good hamon. I still don't turn out a lot of them, because of the "give-n-take" factors.
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
Gotcha! Thanks! I'm holding a piece of 1095 (compliments of my bro DeMo) in my hands as I type. I'm gonna make a simple skinner, with hamon (lol... prob will be a disaster). I'm focusing on simplicity and fit and finish. Please, guys, let me know if the hamon is too much for me at this time. Will post pics as they come.
Remember: Google is your best friend.

Hamon tutorials that helped me.

http://ryanwknives.blogspot.com/2013/01/my-personal-hamon-process.html

http://imageevent.com/paleoaleo/hamonbladetutorial

Carry on!

DeMo
 

Kevin Zito

KNIFE MAKER
I wouldn't say it's too much....we all gotta start somewhere. That being said, creating/exposing a hamon can be tricky at times...if it doesn't work out this time, use it as a learning experience and keep trying. It took me several blades before I figured out all the techniques I needed to achieve a good hamon. I still don't turn out a lot of them, because of the "give-n-take" factors.
Hmmm... MS says tricky... KZ says bye bye. You know, someone once told me that guards can be tricky. I didn't listen, oh, but I listen now. DeMo, thanks for the links. I'm gonna research it more before I make the call 100%. I use google, but I trust you all, and I've found some junk on the internet before. That being said, I'm getting better at sifting. Thanks guys as always.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
Hmmm... MS says tricky... KZ says bye bye. You know, someone once told me that guards can be tricky. I didn't listen, oh, but I listen now. DeMo, thanks for the links. I'm gonna research it more before I make the call 100%. I use google, but I trust you all, and I've found some junk on the internet before. That being said, I'm getting better at sifting. Thanks guys as always.
Ed said "tricky" not "impossible". Granted some makers are able to get more out of a hamon. John Doyle comes to mind. Don Hanson creates a nice hamon. So does Burt Foster.

You are more than capable of getting a hamon created. It just may need some refinement to be perfected. And to get perfected, you need to practice.

If you feel up to it, give it a shot. Just like the guard, you can overcome this obstacle.

DeMo
 

Kevin Zito

KNIFE MAKER
Ed said "tricky" not "impossible". Granted some makers are able to get more out of a hamon. John Doyle comes to mind. Don Hanson creates a nice hamon. So does Burt Foster.

You are more than capable of getting a hamon created. It just may need some refinement to be perfected. And to get perfected, you need to practice.

If you feel up to it, give it a shot. Just like the guard, you can overcome this obstacle.

DeMo
Dennis, you know I'm more than likely gonna try it lol. But fitting that guard taught me everything I needed to know about life haha. By the way, is CRA 1095 the same as 1095. Thanks! Ty sorry for hijacking.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Dennis Morland

KNIFE MAKER
Dennis, you know I'm more than likely gonna try it lol. But fitting that guard taught me everything I needed to know about life haha. By the way, is CRA 1095 the same as 1095. Thanks! Ty sorry for hijacking.
CRA = Cold, rolled. annealed. It is 1095 that has been cold, rolled and annealed.
 

Smallshop

KNIFE MAKER
just a little clarification.... "Cold rolled" is material that got it's final shape at the mill from being squeezed between rollers. "Hot rolled" is done the same way except it is done at high temp. It has less stress in the material than cold rolled but will have scale that can be a bit hard. "Cold Rolled" anything is best if it is "stress relieved" before working with. Stress relieving is heating up the material enough to "relax" all the internal stress caused by rolling.The stress will move the material as you cut/grind/machine. I do not know how the different knife steels are prepped...I'm relaying info from many years of machining various steels. the worst for movement seemed always to be cold rolled 1018...which is a real mild steel.

Hope this helps....
 

Ty Adams

KNIFE MAKER
Dennis, you know I'm more than likely gonna try it lol. But fitting that guard taught me everything I needed to know about life haha. By the way, is CRA 1095 the same as 1095. Thanks! Ty sorry for hijacking.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You're not hijacking anything. This thread is for everyone. I post my knives for people to see. I am open to all comments good and bad. Hamons a nice to look at and add something extra to your knife. Good luck and don't be afraid to try new things.
 

Kevin Zito

KNIFE MAKER
just a little clarification.... "Cold rolled" is material that got it's final shape at the mill from being squeezed between rollers. "Hot rolled" is done the same way except it is done at high temp. It has less stress in the material than cold rolled but will have scale that can be a bit hard. "Cold Rolled" anything is best if it is "stress relieved" before working with. Stress relieving is heating up the material enough to "relax" all the internal stress caused by rolling.The stress will move the material as you cut/grind/machine. I do not know how the different knife steels are prepped...I'm relaying info from many years of machining various steels. the worst for movement seemed always to be cold rolled 1018...which is a real mild steel.

Hope this helps....
Thanks! That does clarify things.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Justin Presson

Well-Known Member
Was off today so I took some time for knifemaking.
Folder Im working on and some fixed blades I got pre heat treat grinds done on.


Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
 
Top