What's going on in your shop?

SS369

Well-Known Member
This last knife leads me to ask a question.
On light colored, unstabilized wood scales, like the quilted Maple I just used, is there something to be done about the epoxy migration from the pin into the wood?
The pins were a tight, tap in fit and the holes were a clean drilling. The scales were thick and sanded with out overheating.
I'm thinking that maybe next time I shouldn't epoxy the pins?

Scott
 

Jon Buescher

Well-Known Member
Got a bit of work done in the shop today I extended the frame on my little hydraulic press then forged some more on this axe head and finally cut out and shaped this little axe handle for the axe I’m making
 

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J. Doyle

Dealer - Purveyor
John, do you use a router and template for the inlays? BTW, those really look nice (and tight!)
Hi Bruce. I use a thin template to lay out the pattern and scribe lines. Then I drill out as much excess material inside the scribe lines as possible. Then everything is hand filed/scraped/sanded from there. The inlays are then also carefully hand fit.

Really happy with how these turned out. They fit nice and snug and had to be gently tapped in place with a rubber mallet.
 

Bruce McLeish

Well-Known Member
Hi Bruce. I use a thin template to lay out the pattern and scribe lines. Then I drill out as much excess material inside the scribe lines as possible. Then everything is hand filed/scraped/sanded from there. The inlays are then also carefully hand fit.

Really happy with how these turned out. They fit nice and snug and had to be gently tapped in place with a rubber mallet.
Thanks for the reply. I've been experimenting with inlays for awhile now and decided that was the correct approach.
 

Randy Lucius

KNIFE MAKER
Hi Bruce. I use a thin template to lay out the pattern and scribe lines. Then I drill out as much excess material inside the scribe lines as possible. Then everything is hand filed/scraped/sanded from there. The inlays are then also carefully hand fit.

Really happy with how these turned out. They fit nice and snug and had to be gently tapped in place with a rubber mallet.
As nice as your inlays are I figured you were milling them out. Done by hand? Now that's impressive!!
 

soundmind

KNIFE MAKER
I found a diamond in the rough...well, not exactly. These pieces are porous. I cut a pair of scales too and one cracked after only one night in the house. But It's surprising the beauty underneath all that junk on the outside. I might clean a bunch and stabilize them.
001.jpg
 

Jon Buescher

Well-Known Member
From a hunk of mild steel, for once the forge weld went right the first time with no finnicking around! The bit is forged out of a piece of .270x2” 1084, I forged it down to about 1” wide and somewhere about 3/8” thick then forged in the taper. This project took way too much time and propane. I learned more on this project than any of my previous ones. And I finally sold something. I modified some of my tools and built some new ones. Made my best axe handle yet! Bought the board from local shop that milled the lumber here in my home town. Kinda cool to see something all locally made. Now I’m looking forward to my next big project!
 

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EdCaffreyMS

"The Montana Bladesmith"
how much do you charge? for the dual peen model?
http://www.caffreyknives.net/angle_peen-hammers.html

And speaking of hammers.....4 DAMASCUS hammers ready for hand sanding (boy does that ever suck... you'd think that sanding a blade would be harder....NOPE!!)
All the angles, rolls, etc on a hammer really make it a pain to get the finish required for a good etch.... or in this case, two of these hammers are 1080/Nickel 200, which means there will get mirror polished, then hot blued/clear Gun-Kote finished) :) I'm sure many have seen/heard that I always say NOT to buff Damascus prior to etching.....that is true, but as usual there is an exception...in the case of using nickel and hot bluing..... there is no need to etch, and in fact if you etch, then try to hot blue, it doesn't work out so well. When hot bluing, it's like Ti and anodizing.....finish dictates how the finish looks...... a satin finish yields a satin blue job..... a "mirror" finish yields a brilliant mirrored blued finish. ;)


BUT!! A guy has gotta take a break when his arms get tired....and do something fun for a few minutes.....





It's nice when the hot shop apron can serve as a place for the "bench"...... and then have 20 & 25yrds left to play with! :)
(the pellet stop is 20 yrds, and the hanging, yellow "swingers" (left side) are 25 yrds.) Shoot a few shots, then back to work! (the gun is a SIG ASP20, .22 cal air rifle...... just sharpening up for when all the gophers start running around "the back 40".
 
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